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android android-asynctask

AsyncTask Android example

707

I was reading about AsyncTask, and I tried the simple program below. But it does not seem to work. How can I make it work?

public class AsyncTaskActivity extends Activity {

    Button btn;

    /** Called when the activity is first created. */
    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.main);

        btn = (Button) findViewById(R.id.button1);
        btn.setOnClickListener((OnClickListener) this);
    }

    public void onClick(View view){
        new LongOperation().execute("");
    }

    private class LongOperation extends AsyncTask<String, Void, String> {
        @Override
        protected String doInBackground(String... params) {
            for(int i=0;i<5;i++) {
                try {
                    Thread.sleep(1000);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
            TextView txt = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.output);
            txt.setText("Executed");
            return null;
        }

        @Override
        protected void onPostExecute(String result) {
        }

        @Override
        protected void onPreExecute() {
        }

        @Override
        protected void onProgressUpdate(Void... values) {
        }
    }
}

I am just trying to change the label after 5 seconds in the background process.

This is my main.xml:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
              android:layout_width="fill_parent"
              android:layout_height="fill_parent"
              android:orientation="vertical" >
    <ProgressBar
        android:id="@+id/progressBar"
        style="?android:attr/progressBarStyleHorizontal"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:indeterminate="false"
        android:max="10"
        android:padding="10dip">
    </ProgressBar>
    <Button
        android:id="@+id/button1"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:text="Start Progress" >
    </Button>
    <TextView android:id="@+id/output"
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:text="Replace"/>
</LinearLayout>

8

714

Ok, you are trying to access the GUI via another thread. This, in the main, is not good practice.

The AsyncTask executes everything in doInBackground() inside of another thread, which does not have access to the GUI where your views are.

preExecute() and postExecute() offer you access to the GUI before and after the heavy lifting occurs in this new thread, and you can even pass the result of the long operation to postExecute() to then show any results of processing.

See these lines where you are later updating your TextView:

TextView txt = findViewById(R.id.output);
txt.setText("Executed");

Put them in onPostExecute().

You will then see your TextView text updated after the doInBackground completes.

I noticed that your onClick listener does not check to see which View has been selected. I find the easiest way to do this is via switch statements. I have a complete class edited below with all suggestions to save confusion.

import android.app.Activity;
import android.os.AsyncTask;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.provider.Settings.System;
import android.view.View;
import android.widget.Button;
import android.widget.TextView;
import android.view.View.OnClickListener;

public class AsyncTaskActivity extends Activity implements OnClickListener {

    Button btn;
    AsyncTask<?, ?, ?> runningTask;

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.main);
        btn = findViewById(R.id.button1);

        // Because we implement OnClickListener, we only
        // have to pass "this" (much easier)
        btn.setOnClickListener(this);
    }

    @Override
    public void onClick(View view) {
        // Detect the view that was "clicked"
        switch (view.getId()) {
        case R.id.button1:
            if (runningTask != null)
                runningTask.cancel(true);
            runningTask = new LongOperation();
            runningTask.execute();
            break;
        }
    }

    @Override
    protected void onDestroy() {
        super.onDestroy();
        // Cancel running task(s) to avoid memory leaks
        if (runningTask != null)
            runningTask.cancel(true);
    }

    private final class LongOperation extends AsyncTask<Void, Void, String> {

        @Override
        protected String doInBackground(Void... params) {
            for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
                try {
                    Thread.sleep(1000);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    // We were cancelled; stop sleeping!
                }
            }
            return "Executed";
        }

        @Override
        protected void onPostExecute(String result) {
            TextView txt = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.output);
            txt.setText("Executed"); // txt.setText(result);
            // You might want to change "executed" for the returned string
            // passed into onPostExecute(), but that is up to you
        }
    }
}

11

  • 2

    I am unable to do this <code> btn.setOnClickListener(this); </code> Eclipse gives an error —– “The method setOnClickListener(View.OnClickListener) in the type View is not applicable for the arguments (AsyncTaskActivity)”

    – Fox

    Mar 12, 2012 at 17:33


  • I would advise changing the setting of the text to not be static but take the argument from the onPostExecute(String result) method. It would make it clearer for future readers that the argument is populated by the return value of doInBackground(String... params).

    Dec 28, 2012 at 10:37

  • @Eric Tobias – That exact things done in the commented section already. I was following and answering the users question in my full example.

    Dec 30, 2012 at 21:13


  • 1

    As an addendum and google seeder (and coming from someone currently learning this stuff which is how I came across this) : the majority of UI updates you’ll do for something where you need progress reported back to the user is in the call back onProgressUpdate which is executed in the main UI thread.

    – RichieHH

    Jan 21, 2014 at 20:45

  • 1

    This will surely mess up if your activity is rotated or destroyed for any reason…

    – Sam

    Sep 9, 2014 at 12:43

714

Ok, you are trying to access the GUI via another thread. This, in the main, is not good practice.

The AsyncTask executes everything in doInBackground() inside of another thread, which does not have access to the GUI where your views are.

preExecute() and postExecute() offer you access to the GUI before and after the heavy lifting occurs in this new thread, and you can even pass the result of the long operation to postExecute() to then show any results of processing.

See these lines where you are later updating your TextView:

TextView txt = findViewById(R.id.output);
txt.setText("Executed");

Put them in onPostExecute().

You will then see your TextView text updated after the doInBackground completes.

I noticed that your onClick listener does not check to see which View has been selected. I find the easiest way to do this is via switch statements. I have a complete class edited below with all suggestions to save confusion.

import android.app.Activity;
import android.os.AsyncTask;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.provider.Settings.System;
import android.view.View;
import android.widget.Button;
import android.widget.TextView;
import android.view.View.OnClickListener;

public class AsyncTaskActivity extends Activity implements OnClickListener {

    Button btn;
    AsyncTask<?, ?, ?> runningTask;

    @Override
    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        setContentView(R.layout.main);
        btn = findViewById(R.id.button1);

        // Because we implement OnClickListener, we only
        // have to pass "this" (much easier)
        btn.setOnClickListener(this);
    }

    @Override
    public void onClick(View view) {
        // Detect the view that was "clicked"
        switch (view.getId()) {
        case R.id.button1:
            if (runningTask != null)
                runningTask.cancel(true);
            runningTask = new LongOperation();
            runningTask.execute();
            break;
        }
    }

    @Override
    protected void onDestroy() {
        super.onDestroy();
        // Cancel running task(s) to avoid memory leaks
        if (runningTask != null)
            runningTask.cancel(true);
    }

    private final class LongOperation extends AsyncTask<Void, Void, String> {

        @Override
        protected String doInBackground(Void... params) {
            for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
                try {
                    Thread.sleep(1000);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    // We were cancelled; stop sleeping!
                }
            }
            return "Executed";
        }

        @Override
        protected void onPostExecute(String result) {
            TextView txt = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.output);
            txt.setText("Executed"); // txt.setText(result);
            // You might want to change "executed" for the returned string
            // passed into onPostExecute(), but that is up to you
        }
    }
}

11

  • 2

    I am unable to do this <code> btn.setOnClickListener(this); </code> Eclipse gives an error —– “The method setOnClickListener(View.OnClickListener) in the type View is not applicable for the arguments (AsyncTaskActivity)”

    – Fox

    Mar 12, 2012 at 17:33


  • I would advise changing the setting of the text to not be static but take the argument from the onPostExecute(String result) method. It would make it clearer for future readers that the argument is populated by the return value of doInBackground(String... params).

    Dec 28, 2012 at 10:37

  • @Eric Tobias – That exact things done in the commented section already. I was following and answering the users question in my full example.

    Dec 30, 2012 at 21:13


  • 1

    As an addendum and google seeder (and coming from someone currently learning this stuff which is how I came across this) : the majority of UI updates you’ll do for something where you need progress reported back to the user is in the call back onProgressUpdate which is executed in the main UI thread.

    – RichieHH

    Jan 21, 2014 at 20:45

  • 1

    This will surely mess up if your activity is rotated or destroyed for any reason…

    – Sam

    Sep 9, 2014 at 12:43

77

I’m sure it is executing properly, but you’re trying to change the UI elements in the background thread and that won’t do.

Revise your call and AsyncTask as follows:

Calling Class

Note: I personally suggest using onPostExecute() wherever you execute your AsyncTask thread and not in the class that extends AsyncTask itself. I think it makes the code easier to read especially if you need the AsyncTask in multiple places handling the results slightly different.

new LongThread() {
    @Override public void onPostExecute(String result) {
        TextView txt = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.output);
        txt.setText(result);
    }
}.execute("");

LongThread class (extends AsyncTask):

@Override
protected String doInBackground(String... params) {
    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
        try {
            Thread.sleep(1000);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    return "Executed";
}      

2

  • 8

    Thanks for providing an example that decouples the AsyncTask from the Activity

    – sthomps

    Aug 7, 2014 at 19:11

  • 2

    yes, finally someone decouples the task and the activity. thank you.And overriding the onPostExecute in the activity is brilliant.

    – mcy

    May 25, 2017 at 8:56